Monday, December 8, 2014

December 8th, 2014 Looking For Inspiration

December 8th, 2014 Looking For Inspiration

I was up early and ready to make today a good day. I enjoyed my coffee, prepared breakfast and was out the door in plenty of time to not feel rushed. This was a good start. In the clarity of my well rested morning, I decided this would be the day I start a weight training routine.

I've done some weight training here and there, but seriously, we both know that if it isn't backed up with consistency, then it isn't going to be effective. Doing some light lifting and body weight strength training--then exclusive cardio for a while, then a day or two of strength training here, followed by two weeks of cardio there...just doesn't count. Results demand consistency. I know this, I'm living this with the exercise and nutrition I make important. So, anyway...

I make this decision this morning, yet--I don't tell anyone. Uh huh...Yep. And why not? Every bite of food I eat gets photographed and tweeted to the world. So why not this decision? Or, if not a tweet--why not facebook, or this blog?

I was giving myself an out. That's why. I have a serious psychological hangup when it comes to weight training and I know where it started.

It was in 8th grade, in the weight room at school. Each of us had to bench press. I watched as everyone went before me, I stepped aside because I didn't want to do it. When it was my turn they left some weights on the bar from the previous kid. I couldn't budge the weight. So they took some off. Still, nothing. Then, they took it down to just the bar. I lifted the bar--then my right arm dropped, unable to handle the weight. The initial laughter wasn't the worst part. It was a couple of kids that kept saying how they couldn't believe I was so weak, that kept going. 

I was a big kid. It was fairly easy to project the illusion of strength. Now, after failing to bench the bar, everyone knew I wasn't. 

Now I know, that was long ago--but seriously, I think it's what keeps me from moving forward and committing to a regular weight training schedule. I sincerely want what it will give me. I suppose the getting started is the hardest part. I honestly believe it will be like my sugar abstinence experience, where I quickly become a believer, 1000%.

I walked into the Y tonight, checked in and went up to the weight training area. It was a busy night (Monday's always seem to be busy) and a lot of people were on the weights. It took me all of about 30 seconds to talk myself out of starting this evening. Instead, I made my way over to the familiar elliptical and worked it hard, like I do. It was a great cardio workout. I was sweating a bunch. But it wasn't weight training. 

I must get over myself in this area. The weight training is imperative for my overall fitness.

Other than that, I'm thrilled with my day. The food was good, the exercise was good--and I feel good. I just wish I could understand how I can commit to doing what I do, everyday--the food, the tweets, the daily blog posting, the consistent exercise---and the consistent weight loss...and, still, I haven't committed to the weight training. 

Do you do strength training? What was it like when you started? I'm curious. If you have the time, I'd appreciate your experience in the comments below. I suppose I'm looking for inspiration.

My Tweets today:


















Thank you for reading and your continued support,
Strength,
Sean

16 comments:

  1. Nope, I don't. And I should. And we have a small apparatus here in our garage. And I still don't. And I know I should... LOL

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    1. I don't and I know I should... I've said it many times, Gwen!

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  2. I am very happy to see this post. It takes great courage to share your reasons why weight training has been a difficult transition. I would check with your local Y, talk to management about your desire to start weight training. I am guessing they know someone more than happy to help you get going. Use your talking skills, incorporate your skills for stand up comedy, do whatever is needed to break the ice. I am willing to bet soon enough you will pick up a lifting buddy, which is important, someone to spot you so there is no fears of not being able to lift that bar of weights. It's all in the mind, no different than swimming in the public pool. This will become rewarding and addicting something you will thank yourself once you start seeing the results. Good luck my friend! You can do it!

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    1. Thank you, Jon! Excellent advice! It was awesome to speak with you again the other day. I appreciate the support!

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  3. Sean - congrats on the food commitment and doing that elliptical! I remember you mentioning some physical problem you have with one side, which I guess was the reason your arm dropped in 8th grade. Check your insurance to see if you could start a program with a TRAINED physical therapist who knows how to work with you. Or a trainer specifically trained as a therapist might be. This is just approaching strength training from an intelligent point of view. I know of too many people that SHOULD have gone this route and either just jumped in or had an "untrained" trainer, and were badly harmed. Be sensible. Once approached the right way you will soon be putting another notch in your belt!!!!
    N~

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    1. Thank you, Nancy! I am definitely going to start small and with the guidance of a good trainer. I appreciate your support!

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  4. Hi Sean. I LOVE weight training. If I had your commitment to the elliptical and you had mine to the weights, we'd be a fitness champion! :-)

    I work out with a trainer at my local Y. It has helped me get back in the groove. I recommend speaking with the person who runs the fitness area at your Y - they can recommend someone good who can show you around or even set up a routine for you. Some trainers are better than others when dealing with injuries or other limitations.

    It's hard to start something new - especially when you have had a bad experience. I love weight training for a couple of reasons. 1) You can see visible physical progress, and progress each time you can move more weight. 2) This has serious implications for real life. Doing a dead lift in the gym is fun. This weekend I had to deadlift my great aunt out of a bath tub. (It didn't have any grab bars - so I was her grab bar!). I am thankful for my physical strength. Not only will it keep me living a healthy and independent life, but as family members age I am better able to help them.

    Good luck - I know you've got this! :-)

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    1. Neca-- If we combined our powers--oh my, unstoppable! :)
      Thank you for sharing your reasons for loving it... I really want to see the progress. And wow, excellent job helping your aunt. That's incredible. Thank you!!

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  5. If anyone needs to get a professional trainer involved it would be you because of your concerns/ hang ups and your history with your arm. There is always the potential for injury if you do it wrong and just follow what others do in the gym. The trainer will help you set goals, teach you correct form and should show how to use both equipment , free weights , and your own body. The good trainers do that approach. I encourage everyone to work with a trainer at least if just for 2 sessions. If financial issues are the concerns , look for alternatives like physical therapy though insurance won't cover it unless an md orders it. You can call a physical therapy center and ask if any of the PT's do one on one training on the side or can you come there and pay for sessions. The Y should also be a good choice . There are some gyms that just do personal training and there are some personal trainers that will come to your home and train you using the equipment and the environment you have. You can interview the trainer to see if there is a good fit. I always set boundaries(how much I will spend and commit to since they often want to sign you in to multi visits) and I think about my goals beforehand. I'm up front with my fears and insecurities (that I know of going in to it.). As pro trainer as I am , I am not working with anyone right now. I tend to do classes and a few things on my own that my trainer taught me. good luck. This might be a good time of year since people usually wait till the new year to start with trainers and then it's hard to schedule the appointment times you want.

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    1. Thank you, PJ! I am absolutely meeting with a trainer at the Y to discuss what we can do. Ooh...I do need to act quickly, the first of the year will be the busiest time, for sure!

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  6. Sean,

    Sent you an email, but check out One Hundred Pushups (link was getting blocked). Its a fantastic program and is suitable for any fitness level. Best of all, you can do it in your home with no eyeballs to judge.

    The email has another suggestion, but I don't want to open that can of worms here :)

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    1. Lance, thank you for the email. I replied earlier today. I think both of your suggestions are awesome. I appreciate it, Lance!

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  7. I agree with what the others above have said. Do not start on your own, rather start slow and with a real trainer (usually not the person manning desk at the gym) or a physical therapist. Learning good form is so very important and no one should become injured by going too fast too soon.

    When I worked with a trainer a few years back before packing back on the weight, I really noticed my overall shape and fitness improved after two months. I started off with one lesson per week with a trainer and then after a few weeks adding one session on my own at the gym as "homework".

    You'll commit when you are ready Sean :)
    -Nikki

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    1. Thank you, Nikki. I really like the sound of your 'take it slow' advice. I totally agree, I will!

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  8. Marilyn from twitterDecember 9, 2014 at 11:50 AM

    It can be a long, slow road - like everything else! - but I love having some muscle. I keep making my husband feel my bicep or whatever, and I've gotten used to the eye rolls on his part! :-)

    I do some weights along with the rest of my weekly workout with a personal trainer. It's wonderful for me that he keeps track of what I'm doing in a notebook and has several pre-choreographed workouts we rotate among, so one week it's more plank and pushups and another week it's more bench press and pullups. Even though it's once a week, I feel so much more robust and healthy! I see a big difference when helping someone move or just carrying a box from here to there in the office.

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    1. Marilyn, thank you! I'm looking forward to the added strength. Reading about yours and the the experiences of others--it's really helping me break down my resistance. It's time for me to act on it!

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